Feline Vaccine Information

FELV/FIV Test:

LRVC recommends testing felines of unknown vaccination history. Please discuss with the veterinarian or a technician if your feline will be strictly indoors as this will change protocols for your feline.

  • Feline Leukemia Virus:  Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is a virus that infects cats. Like all viruses, FeLV is a tiny microorganism that can only replicate itself inside living cells. FeLV is specific to members of the cat family and does not pose a risk to other species of animals or people. FeLV invades various cells of the cat’s immune system and blood-forming tissues. The number of cats infected differs according to the geographical location, environment, and the lifestyle of the cat. Infection is more common in colonies of cats where there is close contact between individuals.

  • Feline Immunodeficiency Virus:  Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a virus specific to the cat family. Although widespread, it is not a common infection in cats. In some cat’s exposure to the virus leads to clinical signs that result in deficiency in the immune system. The FIV test (see below) detects antibodies that have been formed in the cat’s blood because of infection with the feline immunodeficiency virus. ‘FIV-positive’ means that your cat has been infected by the virus, but if it is not showing signs it may be years, if ever, before the cat develops the clinical signs referred to as Feline AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome of cats)
    Rabies Vaccine: LRVC recommends the first vaccine to be given anytime between 4-6 months.

Rabies Vaccine:

LRVC recommends the first vaccine to be given anytime between 4-6 months.

  • A severe, fatal, viral neurological disease of all warm-blooded animals, including humans. Felines with an unknown vaccine history are given a 1year rabies. After receiving their initial 1year rabies any rabies vaccine booster given thereafter is considered valid for 3 years. In order for a rabies vaccine to be considered a 3year vaccine there must be proof of at least one rabies vaccine prior

FVRCP: 

LRVC recommends the FVRCP be given at 8 weeks and 12 weeks. After the initial core kitten vaccines, adult felines are given a booster 1 year after last core vaccine injection then every 3 years thereafter.

This vaccine covers three common diseases:

  • Rhinotracheitis: A Herpes viral infection characterized by severe sneezing, fever, rhinitis, conjunctivitis, and corneal ulcers.
  • Calicivirus: A virus characterized by upper respiratory signs, oral ulcers, pneumonia, and occasional arthritis.
  • Panleukopenia: An infection characterized by depression, vomiting, diarrhea, and dehydration. Commonly fatal. Extremely contagious but well controlled by routine vaccination.

FELV: 

LRVC recommends the FELV be given at 8 weeks and 12 weeks. After the initial core kitten vaccines, adult felines are given a booster 1 year after last core vaccine injection then every 2 years thereafter. This vaccine is given to felines that are going to boarding facilities or going to be going outside where they may be coming into contact with other felines.

  • A virus that causes immunodeficiency and cancer. FELV can be spread by bites, close casual contact, shared dishes, or litter pans. Only cats which go outdoors, have exposure to other cats that go outdoors, or are in high traffic households are recommended to be vaccinated annually after initial vaccine. Cats that do not have high exposure are recommended to be vaccinated once every 2 years after initial vaccines.

Heartworm Test & Prevention:

Even though heartworm incidence is low in felines, heartworm testing and prevention is recommended. LRVC recommends discussing with your veterinarian what is best for your feline friends.